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Internet Safety

  •  96% of students ages 9 to 17 who have access to the Internet have used social networking technologies (Grunwald Associates, "Creating & Connecting - Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," July 2007).
  • 71% of students ages 9 to 17 use social networking sites on a weekly basis (Grunwald Associates, "Creating & Connecting - Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," July 2007).
  • 20% of youth include swear words in their MySpace profiles and 33% of MySpace pages have swear words in the comments sections (Hinduja, S. and Patchin, J.W. "Personal Information of Adolescents on the Internet: a Quantitative analysis of MySpace.com." Journal of Adolescence, 2007).
  • 18% of youth MySpace pages contain evidence of consumption of alcohol by minors, 8% reference underage smoking, and 2% refer to marijuana usage (Hinduja, S. and Patchin, J.W. "Personal Information of Adolescents on the Internet: a Quantitative analysis of MySpace.com." Journal of Adolescence, 2007).
  • 64% of teens post photos or videos of themselves online, while more than half (58%) post info about where they live. Females are far more likely than male teens to post personal photos or videos of themselves (70% vs. 58%) (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • Nearly one in 10 teens (8%) has posted his or her cell phone number online (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • 58% of teens don't think posting photos or other personal info on social networking sites is unsafe (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • Nearly half of teens (47%) aren't worried about others using their personal info in ways they don't want (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • About half (49%) are unconcerned that posting personal info online might negatively affect their future (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • 32% of all teens and 43% of teens active in social networking have been contacted online by a complete stranger (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).
  • Boys are more likely to post personal information than are girls (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).
  • Among teens active in social networking sites, 61% post the name of their city or town, 49% post their school's name, 29% post their email address, and 29% post their last name (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).


Facts about Online Predators and Strangers online:
   
  • 69% of teens regularly receive personal messages online from people they don't know and most of them don't tell a trusted adult about it (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • When they receive online messages from someone they don't know, 60% of teens say they usually ask who the person is, 57% of teens claim they ignore such messages, 31% say they usually reply and chat with people they don't know, and only 21% tell a trusted adult when they receive such messages (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • While 16% of teens say they've considered meeting face to face with someone they've talked to only online, that marks a significant drop compared to the 30% of teens who were considering such a meeting in 2006. In 2007, 8% of teens say they actually have met in person with someone from the Internet, down from 14% in 2006 (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • 23% of children have had an encounter with a stranger on the Internet, including 7% of children who reported having met someone in the real world from the Internet (Harris Interactive, "Kids Outsmart Parents When it Comes to the Internet," August 2007).
  • 79% of sexual solicitation incidents happened to youth while they were using their home computer (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 40% of solicitations began with a solicitor communicating with a youth through an instant message or IM (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 56% of solicitations contained a request for the youth to send photographs of themselves to the solicitor and 27% of solicitations contained a request for the youth to send a sexual picture of themselves (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 30% of teens use chatrooms to converse with strangers (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 90% of sexual solicitations are directed to youth ages 13 and older (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 34% of youth have encountered unwanted sexual material while online (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA).
  • 34% of online solicitors made a phone call to the youth, 18% visited to the youth's home, 12% offered money or other items, and 9% sent offline mail to the youth's address (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria,VA).
  • Only 5% of youth who received a sexual solicitation and 2% of youth who encountered unwanted sexual material online indicated that they have told law enforcement, their Internet service provider, school authorities, or other authorities about the incident (Wolak, J., Mitchell, K., & Finkelhor, D. (2006). Online victimization of youth: Five years later. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Bulletin - #07-06-025. Alexandria, VA


Facts about Cyber Bullying:

  • Cyberbullying is the willful and repeated harm inflicted through the medium of electronic text. It can take place in chat rooms, on social networking websites, through cell phone text messaging, email, and other web-based environments (Burgess -Proctor, Amanda; Patchin, Justin, Ph D , and Hinduja, Sameer, Ph.D. "Cyberbullying - The Victimization of Adolescent Girls," 2007).
  • Common cyberbullying behaviors include name-calling, spreading of gossip or sensitive information, threats, teasing, sexual harassment, being ignored or disrespected, and being deceived by a bully who is misrepresenting themselves (Burgess -Proctor, Amanda; Patchin, Justin, Ph D , and Hinduja, Sameer, Ph.D. "Cyberbullying - The Victimization of Adolescent Girls," 2007).
  • Nearly one in four teens in a relationship (24%) communicated with their partner via cellphone or texting HOURLY between midnight and 5:00am (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • 30% of teens say they are text messaged ten, twenty, even thirty times an hour by a partner inquiring where they are, what they're doing, or who they're with (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • 67% of parents whose teens were checked up on thirty times per day on their cell phone were unaware this was happening (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • 82% of parents whose teens were emailed or texted thirty times per hour were unaware this was happening (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • One in four teens in a relationship (25%) say they have been called names, harassed, or put down by their partner through cellphones and texting (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • One in five teens in a relationship (22%) have been asked to engage in sex by cellphone or the Internet when they do not want to (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • 71% of parents were unaware that their teen is afraid of not responding to a cell phone call, text or IM massage or email for fear of what their partner might do (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  •  67% of parents were unaware that their teen was asked to have sex or engage in sexual acts via cell phone, email, IM, or texting when they did not want to (Teen Research Unlimited, "Tech Abuse in Teen Relationships," January 2007).
  • Only 20% of girls who were bullied online, never knew who was bullying them. 31% were bullied by a friend from school, 36% were bullied by someone else from their school, and 28% were bullied by someone in a chat room (Burgess -Proctor, Amanda; Patchin, Justin, Ph D , and Hinduja, Sameer, Ph.D. "Cyberbullying - The Victimization of Adolescent Girls," 2007).
  • 27% of girls who were bullied decided to retaliate by bullying the person who bullied them. Only 20% informed a parent or another adult. 47% confided in an online buddy, 17% suspended their use of the Internet for a time, and 25% ignored the harassment they received (Burgess -Proctor, Amanda; Patchin, Justin, Ph D , and Hinduja, Sameer, Ph.D. "Cyberbullying - The Victimization of Adolescent Girls," 2007).
  • 43% of youth report that they have experienced some form of cyberbullying in the last year. The incidence of cyberbullying is most prevalent among 15- and 16-year-olds, particularly among girls (Harris Interactive, "Teens and Cyberbullying." Research conducted for the National Crime Prevention Council, February 2007).
  • Teen cyberbullying victims are twice as likely to talk to a friend about a bullying incident as to talk with their parents or another adult (Harris Interactive, "Teens and Cyberbullying." Research conducted for the National Crime Prevention Council, February 2007).

 
Facts about Cyber Crime:
   
  • Currently, 30% of youth admitted to downloading music without paying; this is an improvement over the 53% of youth who illegally downloaded music in 2004 (Harris Interactive for the Business Software Alliance. "Survey Suggests Parental Rules Matter In Encouraging Good Internet Behavior," May 2007).
  • 8% of youth admitted to downloading movies without paying in 2007, down from 10% in 2006 admitting downloading without paying, and
  • 17% reporting so in 2004 (Harris Interactive for the Business Software Alliance. "Survey Suggests Parental Rules Matter In Encouraging Good Internet Behavior," May 2007).
  • When young survey participants were asked what worries them about downloading digital copyrighted software, music, movies or games from the Internet without paying, the top responses were fear of accidentally downloading a computer virus (62%), getting into legal trouble (52%) and accidentally downloading spyware (51%). Fear of getting in trouble with parents ranked fourth at (48%), indicating that parents represent a growing and effective influence on the online practices of youth (Harris Interactive for the Business Software Alliance. "Survey Suggests Parental Rules Matter In Encouraging Good Internet Behavior," May 2007).
  • More than half of college and university students who download unlicensed software and other digital copyrighted files are experiencing computer viruses, spyware, and other harmful effects from their downloading activities:
    • 55% have experienced virus and spyware problems.
    • 20% have had hard drive crashes
    • 18% have had document and file losses (Ipsos for Business Software Alliance. "Public Affairs Study Fact Sheet," March 2007).
  • 21% of children have reported having an experience with inappropriate material via the Internet that made them feel uncomfortable (Harris Interactive, "Kids Outsmart Parents When it Comes to the Internet," August 2007).
  • 31% of youth admit to breaking one or more online safety or behavior rules (using inappropriate language, posting inappropriate pictures, posting personal information, or pretending to be someone they are not) (Grunwald Associates, "Creating & Connecting - Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," July 2007).
  • Teens who use both social networking sites and admit to breaking online safety or behavior rules are significantly more likely to earn lower grades in school than teens who follow the rules when using social networking sites (Grunwald Associates, "Creating & Connecting - Research and Guidelines on Online Social and Educational Networking," July 2007).

 
Facts about Parental Involvement/Influence on Teen's Online Behaviors:
   
  • 90% of ten to twelve-year-old children say their parents know where they are going online, compared with 41% of thirteen to fiftteen-year-old children. (Harris Interactive, "Teens and Cyberbullying." Research conducted for the National Crime Prevention Council, Fe
  • Parents of children under 18 who access the Internet estimate their children are online an average of three hours a week, however, children ages 8-17 admit to spending an average of seven hours online a week, and nearly a quarter (23%) report doing things online that their parents would not condone (Harris Interactive, "Kids Outsmart Parents When it Comes to the Internet," August 2007).
  • 25% of teens say their parents know "little" or "nothing" about what they do online (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • 41% of teens report their parents talk to them "a lot" about Internet safety, and three out of four say their parents have talked to them in the past year about the potential dangers of posting personal info. The level of parental involvement is higher for younger teens and girls (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • Teens whose parents have talked to them "a lot" about Internet safety are more concerned about the risks of sharing personal info online than teens whose parents are less involved (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • Teens whose parents have talked to them "a lot" about online safety are less likely to consider meeting face to face with someone they met on the Internet (12% vs. 20%) (Teen Research Unlimited. "Cox Communications Teen Internet safety Survey Wave II," March 2007).
  • 85% of parents of online teens say they have established rules about the kinds of personal information their child can share over the internet (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).
  • 69% of parents say they have rules about how long their teen can spend online. (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).
  • Only 47% of homes with teens ages 15 to 17 use filtering software. Parents with teens younger than 15 are much more likely to use filtering software, though it is beneficial to youth of all ages (Lenhart, Amanda and Maddox, Mary. "Teens, Privacy, and Online Social Networks - How Teens Manage their Online Identities and Personal Information in the Age of MySpace." April 18, 2007).